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John Banks 1st Indigenous Person to Participate in NASCO Annual Mtg
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from
June 11, 2015
John Banks, a Penobscot Nation citizen and member of the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) since 1987, recently participated in the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization (NASCO) Annual Meeting held in Happy Valley – Goose Bay, Labrador, Canada from June 2 to June 5. John is the first Indigenous Person to serve as an official member of the US delegation to the NASCO Annual Meeting.

Debate heats up over rights of state to limit tribal fishing of eels
Written by Douglas Rooks
from Sun Journal
July 27, 2014
Tensions over saltwater fishing rights have persisted between the state and the Passamaquoddy for many years, and the conflict is now the subject of a report from the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission issued earlier this month. MITSC was created under the Indian Land Claims Settlement Act of 1980, federal legislation that resolved claims by the tribes to nearly two- thirds of the land area of Maine.

Report finds state unilaterally restricts tribe's fishing rights
Written by Edward French
from The Quoddy Tides
July 25, 2014
The Maine Legislature has unilaterally acted to restrict the saltwater fishing rights of Passamaquoddy tribal members by circumventing the required amendment process under the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act, according to a recently issued report from the Maine Indian Tribal State Commission (MITSC). The MITSC report found that the legislature did not receive the consent of the tribe when it approved fishery legislation on three separate occasions -- in 1998, when the first tribal saltwater fishing bill was enacted, and in 2013 and 2014, when tribal elver fishing bills were passed.

Francis on Maine Commission Report: Tribe’s Complaints Are Justified
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from ICTMN
July 20, 2014
Following a new report that says Maine lawmakers violated the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act with the passing of a law this spring that limited the Passamaquoddy Tribe’s jurisdiction over elvers fishing without the tribe’s consent, Penobscot Nation Chief Kirk Francis said in a statement the tribe’s complaints have been proven justified.

Socobasin on ME Commission Rpt: Not a Commercial Venture – Our Culture
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from ICTMN
July 19, 2014
Following a new report that says Maine lawmakers violated the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act with the passing of a law this spring that limited the Passamaquoddy Tribe’s jurisdiction over elvers fishing without the tribe’s consent, Passamaquoddy Tribe at Motahkmikuk Chief Joseph Socobasin wants to make sure the Maine lawmakers know the fishing isn’t a commercial venture – it’s a culture.

Cleaves on Maine Commission Report: Committed to Discussion on Sharing
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from ICTMN
July 18, 2014
Following a new report that says Maine lawmakers violated the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act with the passing of a law this spring that limited the Passamaquoddy Tribe’s jurisdiction over elvers fishing without the tribe’s consent, Passamaquoddy Tribe at Sipayik Chief Reuben (Clayton) Cleaves says the tribe remains committed to finding a common answer.

‘Racism Is Central’ to Tribal Conflict with Maine, Says Report
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from ICTMN
July 17, 2014
When Maine lawmakers passed a law this spring that limited the Passamaquoddy Tribe’s jurisdiction over elvers fishing, they violated the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act by acting without the tribe’s consent, an important new report says.

MITSC Report Finds ME Leg. Circumvented MIA Amendment Process
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from
July 11, 2014
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) released a report on the saltwater fisheries conflict between Passamaquoddy and the State of Maine, finding the Maine Legislature circumvented the amendment process required under the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act (MICSA, http://www.mitsc.org/documents/33_FedSettActALL.pdf) on three separate occasions when it legislated on saltwater fishery issues without the consent of the Passamaquoddy Tribe in 1998, 2013, and 2014. The MITSC calls all parties back to the table to resolve the conflict and reminds the Maine Legislature that it must follow the amendment process specified in the MICSA. The Commission also recommends the use of memoranda of understanding (MOU) between the tribes and the state to resolve long-standing and pervasive conflicts.

Panel finds Maine Legislature erred in passing laws on tribal fishing
Written by Dawn Gagnon
from Bangor Daily News
July 11, 2014
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission released a report Friday in which it found the Maine Legislature circumvented the amendment process set forth in the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act when it passed laws on saltwater fishery matters without the consent of the Passamaquoddy Tribe in 1998, 2013 and 2014.

Why forcing a student newspaper to use a racial slur is wrong on so ma
Written by Erin Rhoda
from Bangor Daily News
May 12, 2014
Non-Native American schools across the nation have long debated whether to keep using American Indian mascots, images and athletic team names. In Langhorne, Pennsylvania, the issue has taken a rather autocratic turn that should serve as a nudge to schools everywhere to abandon racist depictions of Indian nations people.

Scholars discuss tribal treaties, loss of rights and elver fishery
Written by Edward French
from The Quoddy Tides
March 28, 2014
A March 19 discussion at Sipayik by three tribal scholars on different eras of treaty making by the Wabanaki tribes looked at how the rights of the tribes had been reduced, focusing in particular on the elver fishery in Maine, and how the tribes had been moved from shared communal living into profit-based systems. The program, titled "Wabanaki Self-Determination: Earth Treaties to Settlement Acts and Beyond," featured presentations by Andrea Bear Nicholas, a Maliseet from the Tobique First Nation, Gail Dana-Sacco, an assistant research professor at the University of Maine, and Vera Francis, the economic development planner for the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Sipayik.

Tense relationship between Wabanaki tribes, state of Maine dissected
Written by Nell Gluckman
from Bangor Daily News
March 21, 2014
ORONO, Maine — The Indian Land Claims Act of 1980 has been inappropriately interpreted by the state of Maine to restrict the sovereignty of Wabanaki tribes, said speakers at a panel discussion Thursday night at the University of Maine. About 80 people attended the conversation about the history of Wabanaki treaty-making with American governing bodies and the implications in today’s debates about fishing and gaming rights. Tribal scholars likened the land claims act to a modern-day treaty. The Wabanaki tribes are the Maliseet, Micmac, Penobscot and Passamaquoddy.

Wabanaki Self-Determination:Earth Treaties to Settlement Acts & Beyond
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from
March 12, 2014
The Wabanaki Center, Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission, and American Friends Service Committee Healing Justice Program New England present the second annual events in the Wabanaki Treaty Lecture Series for 3/19, noon - 4 pm, Sipayik, & 3/20, 7 pm, Wells Conf. Center, UMaine.

MITSC Urges Dialogue Between Tribes, State on Elvers
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from
January 27, 2014
Today the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) released a letter addressed to the Marine Resources Committee joined by all of its former elected Chairs urging the legislators to reject changes proposed in LD 1625, An Act To Clarify the Law Concerning Maine's Elver Fishing License, that would undermine contested Tribal salt-water fishing rights and strain tribal-state relations. In its January 23 letter, the Commission puts the Legislature and Attorney General’s Office on notice that the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act (MICSA) prohibits extinguishing Aboriginal unceded reserved rights through State legislation.

A chance for Maine to lead on indigenous human rights
Written by Walter Echo-Hawk
from Bangor Daily News
September 2, 2013
In August, the Maine Indian Tribal State Commission sent a 14-page letter accompanied by more than 400 pages of addenda to James Anaya, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The pages contained reams of evidence bolstering the commission’s claim that the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act and the Maine Implementing Act have resulted in members of the state’s Wabanaki tribes living in socioeconomic conditions that have risen to the level of human rights violations.

MITSC reports humanitarian crisis in tribes
Written by Edward French
from The Quoddy Tides
August 23, 2013
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) has forwarded documents to a United Nations investigator that the commission says show a humanitarian crisis facing Wabanaki tribes in Maine caused by the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act (MICSA) and the Maine Implementing Act (MIA).

ME Commission Seeks UN Action on State’s Tribal Human Rights Violation
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from ICTMN
August 22, 2013
A mix of anti-Indian laws and court rulings along with the Maine state attorney general’s unilateral interpretations of the Wabanaki nations’ settlement acts have imposed restrictive conditions on the tribes that now rise to the level of human rights violations, the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) has reported to the United Nations Human Rights Council.

Maine State-Tribal Commission Raises Human Rights Concerns with UN
Written by Jay Field
from MPBN
August 14, 2013
A state-tribal relations commission is raising concerns that enforcement of the Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 is violating the human rights of the state's Native Americans. The law, signed by former President Jimmy Carter in 1980, gave the tribes more than $80 million, and offered them federal recognition.* In return, the tribes agreed to abide by Maine's laws. But in a recent letter to a United Nations official, the tribes say the arrangement has been enforced and interpreted in a way that has violated the human rights of Maine's Wabanaki people. Jay Field reports. * See Editor's Note below

Maine Tribal-State Commission airs human rights concerns to UN
Written by Nick McCrea
from Bangor Daily News
August 13, 2013
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission submitted a 14 page letter to UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples James Anaya explaining how the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act and Maine Implementing Act are causing the structural oppression of Wabanaki Tribes within the State of Maine.

MITSC Documents Humanitarian Crisis Faced by Wabanaki Tribes
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission
August 9, 2013
Responding to a request from UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples James Anaya, the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) recently submitted a fourteen page letter and twenty-one documents supplementing its original filing of May 16, 2012 asserting that the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act (MICSA) and Maine Implementing Act (MIA) “have created structural inequities that have resulted in conditions that have risen to the level of human rights violations.”

TRC Calls for Reflection 2/11 To Precede 2/12 Seating of Commissioners
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare TRC
February 4, 2013
The Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth & Reconciliation Commission (TRC) calls upon all people to help prepare them for their difficult work by participating in a Day of Reflection, Meditation and Prayer on February 11. Following the Day of Reflection, Meditation and Prayer, the five TRC Commissioners, Matthew Dunlap, gkisedtanamoogk, Dr. Gail Werrbach, Sandra White Hawk, and Carol Wishcamper, will be officially sworn in on February 12 at an event to take place at Morgan Hill Event Center, Hermon, beginning at 10 am.

5 picked for group to examine child welfare practices that split Nativ
Written by Nick McCrea
from Bangor Daily News
December 18, 2012
During a 12/18/12 news conference held at Indian Island, the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth & Reconciliation (TRC)Selection Panel announced the names of the five TRC Commissioners - Matt Dunlap, gkisedtanamoogk, Gail Werrbach, Sandra White Hawk, and Carol Wishcamper.

A step toward better care for Wabanaki children, community healing
Written by Erin Rhoda
from Bangor Daily News
December 18, 2012
The injustice of what happened to many American Indian families in Maine can be overwhelming. But there is also hope, which comes from the collaboration of entities that were long foes: the state and Wabanaki tribal governments. On Tuesday, they took an encouraging step along what will be a long road of relationship-building and, hopefully, improvements to the child welfare system.

Selection Panel Announces Names of Wabanaki-State TRC Commissioners
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare TRC
December 18, 2012
On December 18, 2012, the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth & Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Selection Panel announced the names of the five Commissioners it had chosen. TRC Interim Director Carolyn Morrison announced that the thirteen-member Selection Panel had unanimously chosen Matt Dunlap, Old Town, Maine; gkisedtanamoogk, Otter Clan, Mashpee Wampanoag, Orono, Maine; Gail Werrbach, Bangor, Maine ; Sandy White Hawk, Sicangu Lakota of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, St. Paul, Minnesota; and Carol Wishcamper, Freeport, Maine.

Maine Wabanaki-State TRC Selection Panel Issues Call for Nominations
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Wabanaki-State TRC Selection Panel
August 31, 2012
On August 31, 2012, the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth & Reconciliation (TRC) Selection Panel, the group tasked by the Wabanaki Tribal Governments and the State of Maine to select five Commissioners to serve on the TRC, invited the public to nominate people for the Selection Panel’s consideration.

Wabanaki Tribal Govts., State of ME Sign TRC Mandate document
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth & Reconciliation Commission
June 29, 2012
On May 29, 2012, five Wabanaki Chiefs and Governor Paul LePage signed a Mandate document commencing the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission process involving a collaborative effort to examine what has happened, what is happening, and what needs to happen regarding Maine child welfare practices affecting Wabanaki people.

Wabanaki Tribal Govts., State of ME Sign TRC Mandate document
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth & Reconciliation Commission
June 29, 2012
On May 29, 2012, five Wabanaki Chiefs and Governor Paul LePage signed a Mandate document commencing the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission process involving a collaborative effort to examine what has happened, what is happening, and what needs to happen regarding Maine child welfare practices affecting Wabanaki people.

Statement on Sanford School Committee's decision to drop redskins
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission
May 7, 2012
The statement of MITSC Executive Director John Dieffenbacher-Krall reacting to the news that the Sanford School Committee voted to stop using the mascot redskins.

Building the Beloved Community, Moving Forward w/ Respect: Sanford HS
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission
April 11, 2012
The announcement for a community conversation concerning the Sanford HS mascot held April 11, 2012 at the North Parish Congregational Church, Sanford.

Symposium on ME School Use Of Indian Nicknames & Mascots 5/15/10
Written by Ed Rice/John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from
May 5, 2010
The continuing nationwide controversy about public school and college use of Native American images as sporting symbols will be addressed in a symposium, entitled “Respectful or Disgraceful?: Examining Maine School Use of Indian Nicknames and Mascots,” to be held on Saturday, May 15, 2010 from 1-4 p.m. in the Bangor Public Library.

Maliseet Indians gain a voice
Written by Jim McCarthy, Editorial Page Editor
from Times Record
April 15, 2010
Now that the 124th Legislature has wrapped up its second session, we give credit to Priest, Bliss and other lawmakers for enacting several bills that build a stronger foundation of respect and trust between the state and Maine’s native peoples. A leading example is Priest’s LD 445, “An Act To Improve Tribal-State Relations,” which gives the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians the right to elect a tribal representative to the Legislature beginning in 2012. Gov. John Baldacci signed the measure into law on Monday.

Tribal leaders: Maine governor’s consultation order is ‘a step forward
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
March 30, 2010
Gov. John Baldacci has signed an executive order directing state agencies to develop and implement policies to consult with the Wabanaki nations when developing legislation, rules and policies on matters that affect them.

A step in the right direction
Written by Jim McCarthy, Editorial Page Editor
from Times Record
February 26, 2010
With a stroke of his pen on Wednesday, Gov. John Baldacci signed an executive order to promote “effective communication” between the Maine state government and the Native American tribes who live in Maine. In doing so, he took a major step toward improving the state’s relationship with Maine’s Wabanaki peoples — the Penobscot Nation, the Passamaquoddy tribes of Indian Township and Pleasant Point, the Houlton Band of Maliseets and the Aroostook Band of Micmacs.

Tribes praise executive order
Written by Kevin Miller
from Bangor Daily News
February 25, 2010
Leaders of Maine’s Indian tribes praised an executive order signed Wednesday by Gov. John Baldacci that aims to improve communications between state agencies and tribal governments.

OPINION: Wabanaki-State of Maine Relations Strained
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Wabanaki Legal News
February 15, 2010
Wabanaki-Maine relations remain severely strained for several major reasons. To improve the relationship, the State and Wabanaki would benefit from a more centralized and coordinated approach to tribal-state relations.

MITSC chairman Bisulca stepping down
Written by Michael R. Brown
from The Quoddy Tides
February 12, 2010
Citing lack of progress after four years as the chairman of the Maine Indian Tribal State Commission (MITSC), Paul Bisulca recently announced he is stepping down. While mentioning some progress has been made in tribal state relations since the settlement act of 1980, Bisulca cited the need for a process for executive and legislative branches to heed concerns expressed by the tribes because the state has not honored agreements to affirm the sovereignty of the Wabanaki nation.

Bill would require state to consult tribes first
Written by Kevin Miller
from Bangor Daily News
January 27, 2010
Maine’s tribal leaders are asking the Legislature to require that state agencies consult with tribes before beginning work on policy changes that could affect their communities.

State continues to disrespect tribal sovereignty
Written by Chiefs Brenda Commander and Kirk Francis
from Bangor Daily News
January 23, 2010
The struggle to exercise our right to self-determination, self-governance and our inherent sovereignty continues today. When we settled our land claims, we looked forward to a new relationship with the state, one based on mutual respect and the recognition of each signatory’s inherent sovereignty. The parent-child relationship that had characterized Wabanaki-Maine relations for most of the preceding 160 years should have ended. Sadly, it continues to manifest itself in many forms.

Tribal-state relations need repair
Written by Jim McCarthy, Editorial Page Editor
from Times Record
January 22, 2010
Paul Bisulca’s decision to step down as the unpaid chairman of the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission should be a wake-up call to all Mainers — not just our political leaders in Augusta — that our relationship with Maine’s Wabanaki tribes needs some serious attention.

Tribal commission leader resigns, cites state failures
Written by Kevin Miller
from Bangor Daily News
January 22, 2010
The chairman of the intergovernmental commission that handles tribal-state relations said he is stepping down in large part because of his continued frustration over state government’s failure to address key issues important to Maine’s Indian tribes.

MITSC chair’s departure ‘a great loss’
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
January 20, 2010
Citing the state’s unwillingness to honor agreements that were meant to affirm and enhance the Wabanaki nations’ sovereignty, the chairman of the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission has declined to serve another term.

Chair of Tribal-State Commission Leaving Post
Written by Anne Mostue
from Maine Public Radio
January 20, 2010
The chair of the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission is ending his four-year term amid growing frustration with what he says is the state's failure to validate the commission's recommendations or to recognize tribal sovereignty. Disputes over land use, gambling and other issues have strained the state-tribal relationship in recent years.

On a day of equality, let's not forget Maine's tribal communities
Written by Ron Conant
from Portland Press Herald
January 18, 2010
There is much to do before members of Native American society have their rights respected.

Maine state power
Written by
from Indian Country Today
December 22, 2009
In this 1829 letter from the Penobscot ‘Governors and Indians in Council’ to the governor of Maine, the Penobscot Nation leadership appeals to the governor to not request any more of the Tribe's land until all of the State's existing land has been "cleared and settled."

Penobscot chief calls on Obama to help stop state erosion of tribal so
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
December 22, 2009
Penobscot Indian Nation Chief Kirk Francis has written to President Obama seeking intervention on behalf of Maine’s Wabanaki tribes to restore both the spirit and intention of the 1980 law that was meant to enhance the tribal nations’ inherent sovereignty, not increase and consolidate state power over the tribes.

Maine tribes heartened by Obama outreach
Written by Meg Haskell
from Bangor Daily News
December 11, 2009
Maine tribal leaders are encouraged by the straightforward approach President Barack Obama is taking to strengthening relations between all American Indian tribes and the federal government.

‘Honor’ settlement act by protecting sovereignty
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
November 17, 2009
The leader of the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians could not attend the historic Tribal Nations Conference with President Barack Obama; instead she sent him a message.

Wabanaki: A New Dawn now available for online viewing
Written by
from
October 19, 2009
MITSC have posted Wabanaki: A New Dawn online.

Wabanaki Bates-Bowdoin-Colby Collaborative
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
October 19, 2009
The Wabanaki/Bates, Bowdoin, and Colby Collaborative brings three of the most prestigious liberal arts colleges in the country together – Maine’s Bates, Bowdoin and Colby colleges – and the four Wabanaki tribes – the Penobscots, the Maliseets, the Passamaquoddy and the Micmacs – in a unique two-way educational partnership that aims to increase the number of Indian students attending colleges while expanding knowledge and understanding about Maine’s indigenous people in the college communities.

Four tribes from Maine to share culture at UMA
Written by Lynn Ascrizzi
from Bangor Daily News
October 13, 2009
The four tribes in Maine — Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac and Maliseet — collectively called “Wabanaki” or “People of the Dawn Land” — will be represented at Wabanaki Perspectives and Human Awareness, whose goal is to generate greater awareness of the depth, beauty and relevancy of the tribal culture in our state.

Wabanaki perspectives event set at UMA
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from The Quoddy Tides
October 9, 2009
Passamaquoddy Tribal Council members Wayne Newell and Elizabeth Neptune and Passamaquoddy veteran Hilda Lewis are among the featured speakers at the University of Maine at Augusta event "Wabanaki Perspectives and Human Awareness." The four day event, from October 13 to 16, is designed to educate the non Native public and campus community about the Wabanaki, one of the oldest continuous cultures in the world, while also creating opportunities for Wabanaki students and adults to meet and to celebrate their culture.

An education in the ways of the Wabanaki
Written by Matthew Stone
from Kennebec Journal
October 5, 2009
The University of Maine at Augusta is hosting "Wabanaki Perspectives and Human Awareness," which runs October 13 - 16. Each day will feature a mix of discussion panels, presentations, demonstrations and hands-on activities.

Tribal Rep. Wayne Mitchell to Present Legislative Resolution
Written by
from
July 23, 2009
On Tuesday, July 28, 2009 at 11:00 am the Penobscot Indian Nation will hold a press conference at the gravesite of Louis Sockalexis on Indian Island to receive two resolutions passed by the Maine Legislature last month calling on the Baseball Hall of Fame, the Cleveland Indians, and Sports Illustrated to respect and to honor the athletic achievements of Louis Sockalexis and his cousin, Andrew Sockalexis.

Stockton squashes request for right to rename roads
Written by Steve Fuller
from The Republican Journal
June 25, 2009
Residents who attended the town's annual meeting June 20 voted down an article that would have given owners of any privately owned road the exclusive right to name or rename that road.

Maliseets mark Native American Veterans Day
Written by Jen Lynds
from Bangor Daily News
June 23, 2009
A solemn crowd gathered at the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians’ reservation Monday afternoon as the tribe marked Native American Veterans Day in the state.

Penobscot D-Day veteran Shay lauded in France
Written by Abigail Curtis
from Bangor Daily News
June 23, 2009
Charles Shay caught his first glimpse of France over the side of a World War II landing craft during the first wave of the Allied invasion of France on D-Day 65 years ago. Last week, Shay returned from an epic trip to France which encompassed a visit to the baron’s ancestral home in Bearn, as well as a stop at the D-Day memorial ceremony in Normandy.

Penobscots celebrate day for Native American vets
Written by Abigail Curtis
from Bangor Daily News
June 23, 2009
They fought in all of the wars of this country, even though they weren’t recognized as full American citizens until 1964. So it is high time to celebrate Maine’s first Native American Veterans Day, Penobscot Indians said at a veterans recognition dinner held Friday night at the Penobscot Nation Community Building on Indian Island.

In Maine, Residents Battle Over a Four-Letter Word: 'Squa'
Written by Philip Shishkin
from Wall Street Journal
June 18, 2009
Out of Deference to Tribes, State Outlaws It in Names of Public Places, Prompting a Squall

This offensive names law should settle 'squaw' issue for good
Written by Editorial staff Sunday Telegram
from Sunday Telegram
June 14, 2009
No Native American child should have to visit a place, travel a public road or see a name on a map that either by intent or indifference contains an ethnic slur against them. That's what the state wanted nine years ago when the original legislation was passed, and that's what should finally be achieved by this latest version of the law.

House honors Sockalexis cousins
Written by Kevin Miller
from Bangor Daily News
June 11, 2009
Representatives of the Maine’s American Indian tribes are ramping up their campaign to gain public recognition and respect for two cousins from the Penobscot Nation who they claim have been largely forgotten or ignored by sports historians. That campaign moved to Augusta on Wednesday when the House approved two resolutions honoring Louis and Andrew Sockalexis for their historic athletic feats during the late 1800s and early 1900s.

New law expands ban on ‘squaw’
Written by Kevin Miller
from Bangor Daily News
June 9, 2009
Gov. John Baldacci on Monday signed a bill that expands Maine’s prohibition on use of “squaw” in official place names to close what supporters said was a loophole in the law.

Naming of places using Indian slur targeted
Written by Glenn Adams
from Portland Press Herald
June 9, 2009
Gov. John Baldacci on Monday signed a bill to tighten a nine-year-old law that bars the use of the word "squaw" for official place names. The word is offensive to Native Americans, who say it's degrading to women.

Maine man’s story reflects horror of war, honor of sacrifice
Written by Abigail Curtis
from Bangor Daily News
June 6, 2009
Though Shay made a pilgrimage of sorts to Omaha Beach in 2007, he has never been to one of the official celebrations in the 65 years since the invasion. That is changing today, with Shay’s presence at a commemoration ceremony in Normandy which is also being attended by President Obama, President Nicolas Sarkozy of France, and other remaining veterans who can make the voyage. Attendees will pay tribute to the veterans and fallen soldiers at the beaches and the cemeteries filled with acres of white crosses.

Maine author to speak at Baseball Hall of Fame
Written by AP
from Indian Country Today
May 27, 2009
Maine author Ed Rice is going to the Baseball Hall of Fame, where he will moderate a panel addressing the role of Native Americans in Major League Baseball.

On the signing of Maine’s Native American Veterans Day law
Written by Charles Shay
from Indian Country Today
May 22, 2009
As one of the last surviving Maine Indian combat veterans who served our country in the second World War, I was grateful for the opportunity to witness Gov. Baldacci signing legislation formally establishing Native American Veterans Day in Maine.

Wabanaki veterans honored with Native American Veterans Day
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
May 22, 2009
Veterans who are tribal members of the Wabanaki Confederacy will be recognized each year on a newly designated Native American Veterans Day. The State of Maine has officially designated June 21 as Native American Veterans Day.

Governor Signs Bill Establishing Native American Veterans Day
Written by
from Maine Public Radio
May 1, 2009
June 21 has been officially designated as Native American Veterans Day.

"I'm going to Colby"
Written by Gerry Boyle
from Colby Magazine
May 1, 2009
Wabanaki students get taste of college through the Early College Awareness program, an initiative of the Wabanaki/Bates, Bowdoin, and Colby Colleges Collaborative

Colby students visit Beatrice Rafferty
Written by Lora Whelan
from The Quoddy Tides
April 10, 2009
During a recent Thursday morning, students at Beatrice Rafferty met with Colby College students for a morning of activities centered on early college awareness. The program, Wabanaki/Bates, Bowdoin and Colby Collaborative Early Awareness Program, encourages Wabanaki students in late elementary and junior high school to attend college.

Encouraging Tribal Youth To Consider Higher Education
Written by Anne Ravana
from Maine Public Radio
April 3, 2009
Students from Colby, Bates and Bowdoin colleges are collaborating with Maine's Wabanaki Indian tribes to encourage tribal youth to plan for higher education, and put these private Maine colleges on their radar. Educators say that Native American students make up only a very small percentage of most college campuses, and that early interaction is key to raising aspirations.

Colby students pitch college to Indian kids
Written by Diana Graettinger
from Bangor Daily News
March 26, 2009
Bangor Daily News reporter Diana Graettinger sits in on Colby College Early College Awareness Team visit to the Indian Township School on March 25, 2009.

Judiciary hears overview of Maine tribe relations
Written by Meg Haskell
from Bangor Daily News
March 20, 2009
Members of the Legislature’s Judiciary Committee on Thursday got an overview of the legal relationship between the state of Maine and the American Indian tribes whose presence here predates the arrival of European explorers.

Silence bespeaks frustration
Written by Jim McCarthy
from Times Record
February 19, 2009
Lawmakers on the two committees today should endorse the governor's budget proposal for MITSC. And their next step should be to attach a proviso calling for establishment of a new budget-setting process for the tribal-state commission. That new process would acknowledge that Maine's tribes are equal partners with the state in deciding what MITSC will do, how much it will cost and how to fairly apportion that cost. It would begin to restore a mutual respect and understanding that was seen by signatories of the 1980 Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act as key to its success.

Respecting Maine's Native Americans
Written by Doug Rooks
from Times Record
February 19, 2009
Again, the Legislature has resisted recognizing the tribes as a distinct entity. The current legislative session might not yield major improvements to the tribes' status. At this point, just getting everyone back at the table would be notable. Yet as lawmakers take up tribal issues again, they should clearly acknowledge that a little respect goes a long way — and is always a good place to start.

A matter of respect and trust
Written by Jim McCarthy
from Times Record
January 29, 2009
Maine's Wabanaki people have reason to be cautiously optimistic that the 124th Legislature is proceeding down a more respectful and positive path than its predecessor with respect to relations between the tribes and state government. Which is all to the good, since the Penobscot Nation, Passamaquoddy tribes, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians and Aroostook Band of Micmacs had been treated so shabbily in the last legislative session.

A New Tribal Focus
Written by Bangor Daily News editorial staff
from Bangor Daily News
January 13, 2009
Maine's Indian tribes have seen more than their share of disappointments in recent years. And because of this, the tribes take a bleak view of their immediate future, believing that much of what they want to achieve has been thwarted by a state government insensitive to their unique position as a “nation within a nation,” as they see it. Some tribal leaders believe the state has been downright disrespectful, and they are waiting for state officials to acknowledge this perceived bad behavior before renewing relations with Augusta. Instead, the tribes should seize the moment and move forward. Less focus should be put on the process by which the tribes interface with the state, and more emphasis put on negotiating what the tribes want.

On tribal-state relations...
Written by Tony Ronzio
from Sun Journal
December 14, 2008
Abysmal relations between Maine's Indian tribes and state government need an injection of optimism. Breakdowns come in protocol, procedure and parliamentary rules.These conflicts were rooted in process. How do entities that expect and arguably deserve sovereign treatment lobby another government like a supplicant? How can the state legislate matters in which their cultural experience and intelligence is considered weak by the tribes?

Tribal-state rift awaiting new Legislature
Written by Christopher Cousins
from Times Record
December 10, 2008
The 124th Legislature's two tribal representatives will come to Augusta in January with complex and far-reaching agendas, despite tribal-state relations that some say have plummeted to historic lows.

Commission in shuttle diplomacy to heal tribal-state rift
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
December 8, 2008
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission has met separately with tribal leaders and the governor in an effort to bring the parties together, but so far the relationship remains severed.

Commission recommends wide ranging reforms in tribal-state relations
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
December 8, 2008
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission’s annual report recommends broad reforms in its budget process, consultation and education to improve the tribal-state relationship.

THUMBS DOWN— No talk, no action
Written by Times Record editorial
from Times Record
October 20, 2008
Relations between state government and Maine's tribes continue to atrophy. After the Judiciary Committee scuttled a package of recommendations from the Tribal-State Work Group at the end of the 123rd Legislature's second session in April, both parties retreated. However, rather than providing a cooling-off period, the inaction has made matters worse.

Maine tribal-state commission withdraws from state budget process
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
September 19, 2008
The chairman of the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission said the commission will no longer participate in the state Legislature’s budget process because, according to the statutes, decisions about the commission’s funding and how it is spent must be made on a government-to-government basis between the tribes and the state.

Tribes seeking stronger commitment from state
Written by Edward French
from The Quoddy Tides
July 25, 2008
Although restoration of much of the funding for the Maine Indian-Tribal State Commission (MITSC) by Governor John Baldacci is welcomed by Passamaquoddy tribal officials, they are seeking a stronger statement from Maine officials of their commitment to work on issues involving the state and the tribes before returning to discussions on those issues.

Tribal board's funding restored
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
July 22, 2008
The governor has restored funding previously cut from the Maine Indian-Tribal State Commission, but whether the action will persuade tribes to participate in the commission is up in the air.

Maine governor restores tribal-state commission funding
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
July 18, 2008
The funding that was cut from the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission's budget by the judiciary committee has been restored by the governor.

THUMBS UP — Investing in trust
Written by Times Record editorial
from Times Record
July 14, 2008
During his five-and-a-half years in office, Gov. John Baldacci has provided critics with ample reasons to fault his policymaking and leadership skills. But no one can fairly question his personal integrity. Honor and loyalty obviously number among the most important principles in Baldacci's personal and political value systems, and he has repeatedly demonstrated that he is a man of his word. That laudable attribute was particularly apparent in his work to restore $38,000 that the Legislature cut earlier this year from the budget for the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission, the important panel that offers the last, best hope to improve the frayed relationship between state government and the Wabanaki tribes.

Institutionalizing injustice
Written by Doug Rooks
from Times Record
June 26, 2008
The tribes' unique status doesn't mean they can be ignored, or treated as second-class citizens, as they have been on a host of issues. The Wabanaki should be afforded access to housing, to schools, including higher education, and to revenue on an equivalent basis, while recognizing that they are not the same as Maine's municipal governments. There should, in short, be fair and active bargaining on both sides, with agreements both will honor for the long term. There's no time like the present to get started.

Maine commission launches initiative to heal tribal-state wounds
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
June 20, 2008
The chairman of the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission is trying to repair a fracture between the Wabanaki tribes and the state. On June 3, MITSC Chairman Paul Bisulca wrote to Gov. John Baldacci, Senate President Beth Edmonds and House Speaker Glenn Cummings, suggesting a meeting of the Wabanaki chiefs, tribal councils, tribal legislative representatives, legislative leaders and their staff, the governor's office and the commission.

Tribal-state relations need new strategies
Written by Sun Journal editorial
from Sun Journal
June 17, 2008
Degradation of tribal-state relations in Maine - beyond gambling, of course - has less to do with money, and more to do about respect.

Indian Island: Indian group cancels meeting
Written by Eric Russell
from Bangor Daily News
June 14, 2008
The relationship between the Penobscot Indian Nation and state government, already at perhaps its sourest point in years, apparently won't be improving anytime soon. The latest indication of strife came when a meeting that was scheduled for next week in Augusta between the National Conference of American Indians and the National Conference of State Legislatures was postponed. The NCAI canceled the meeting as a show of solidarity to Maine’s tribal leaders, particularly the Penobscots, who have begun severing ties with the state over issues with sovereignty and gaming, Penobscot Chief Kirk Francis said Friday.

NCAI cancels Maine meeting in solidarity with Wabanaki tribes
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
June 13, 2008
The National Conference of American Indians has dropped out of a scheduled joint meeting in Maine with the National Conference of State Legislatures in solidarity with Wabanaki tribal leaders, and has issued a resolution urging the state of Maine to support tribal authority.

Empty feelings on Indian Island
Written by Tony Ronzio
from Sun Journal
June 1, 2008
Tribal-state relations are at loggerheads, again. Which side is to blame for the breakdown?

Racism in Maine
Written by Maria Holt
from Times Record
May 30, 2008
If we want to see a history of violence and oppression, we don't have to look outside the borders of this state. I refer to the legacy of the French and Indian wars, and the resulting uneasy relationship between the state of Maine and the Wabanaki people, addressed to some extent by the settlement of the Indian Land Claims case, but still leaving open questions of the sovereignty of the five Wabanaki tribal governments.

Bridge To Indian Island
Written by BDN staff
from Bangor Daily News
May 29, 2008
Indian Island, home of the Penobscot Indian Nation, is a visual metaphor for the often uneasy relationship the native peoples have with Maine. That relationship has deteriorated in recent months to the point that the Penobscots are considering severing ties with state government.

Colonial thinking
Written by Times Record editorial
from Times Record
May 16, 2008
Efforts during the 2008 legislative session to improve relations between Maine's native tribes and state government backfired horribly. Late-session legislative maneuvering triggered a communication breakdown that threatens to rupture into an irreparable breach of trust.

Backlash: Maliseet denounces state's budget cut
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
May 9, 2008
The chief of the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians has written a scathing letter to Maine Gov. John Baldacci, castigating the government for ''unilaterally'' slashing $38,000 from the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission, and announcing the tribe will withhold its contribution to the commission until state funding is restored.

Tribal Gamble
Written by Bangor Daily News editorial
from Bangor Daily News
April 30, 2008
Gov. John Baldacci’s veto of Penobscot Nation plans to install slot machines on Indian Island has grabbed headlines. But tribal frustration with state officials goes way beyond gambling. The Legislature’s failure to make meaningful updates to the tribes’ status and a massive cut to the commission that provides the only formal link between the state and the tribes fueled that frustration. But severing tribal ties with the state won’t help the situation, and will actually move both the state and the tribe in the wrong direction.

Tribes are not political subdivisions
Written by John Banks and Paul Jacques
from Sun Journal
April 6, 2008
As state and tribal representatives on the Maine Indian Tribal State Commission, we are responding to the editorial "Tribes can be sovereign and transparent." (March 29). The editorial suggests that federally recognized tribes living within the borders of what is now the state of Maine should be subject to the state's Freedom of Access Act. We disagree.

Maine's Obama moment
Written by Times Record editorial
from Times Record
April 1, 2008
Opponents' chief complaint against LD 2221 is that it affirms the tribes' exemption from the Maine Freedom of Access Act. During legislative hearings on that aspect of the legislation, the bill's detractors — including the Maine Press Association, of which this newspaper is a member — argued, persuasively, that the Freedom of Access Act protects the public's interest by ensuring accountability and honest government. Therein lies the problem. History brims with evidence that state and federal governments have been far less than honest in past dealings with Maine's tribes. State access laws have been used in previous negotiations to undermine Passamaquoddy and Penobscot bargaining positions. That historical context cannot be discounted based on the hope that trying to force Native American nations to comply with state laws will somehow promote future accountability or open governance.

Committee OKs tribes' exclusion from access law
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
March 27, 2008
The state Judiciary Committee Tuesday voted to exempt Maine’s Indian tribes from the state law that requires government agencies to give members of the public access to documents. The decision was part of the committee’s debate on LD 2221, an act that proposes to change the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980.

Wabanaki fight powerful lobbies on FOI exemption
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
March 21, 2008
Wabanaki tribes are facing a new sovereignty struggle as Maine's newspapers and powerful paper lobby try to quash a proposal that would exempt the tribes from the state's Freedom of Access Act. The exemption is part of a proposed bill - Legislative Document 2221 - that would change a few provisions of the Maine Implementing Act, the legislation that enacted the federal 1980 Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act.

Micmacs pull out of Indian act changes
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
March 20, 2008
The Aroostook Band of Micmacs has requested that it be removed from the proposed changes to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 while the tribe is involved in settling an election dispute that dates back to May 2007.

In defense of tribal rights
Written by Tom Bulger
from Bangor Daily News
March 20, 2008
The Bangor Daily News’ support for the Tribal-State Work Group’s proposed legislation, LD 2221, is a help to moving Maine forward. I wish the BDN would re-examine its stance on asking tribal compliance with Maine’s Freedom of Access Act.

Keep Maine Indians sovereign
Written by Pat LaMarche
from Bangor Daily News
March 19, 2008
The Maine Legislature will vote soon on a bill to secure the sovereignty of the tribes. It’s LD 2221. Think about what being a Native American must and should mean. Tell your legislator to vote to preserve native sovereignty. We’ve taken their land and the lives of nearly all their forbearers. For justice sake, preserve their right to self-govern.

Tribal sovereignty
Written by Tom Bulger
from Sun Journal
March 13, 2008
The tribes must be allowed to keep their business their business. I am a big fan of open government, but that is in regard to Washington, and matters we have a right to be informed of. Why don't we try to accomplish that and let the Penobscot Nation worry about the Penobscot Nation.

Public hearing debates changes to Indian act
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
March 12, 2008
The Legislature’s Judiciary Committee on Tuesday heard a second day of testimony from people on both sides of the fence regarding proposed changes to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980.

A level field for tribal-state relations
Written by Sun Journal editorial
from Sun Journal
March 8, 2008
LD 2221, now before the Legislature, would build a needed bridge between the tribes and state. It reopens the settlement act, fixes what's broken, and sets the stage for the tribes and state to move into the future together.

Local leader oppose state changes in tribal rights
Written by Debra Walsh
from Aroostook Republican
March 5, 2008
Officials representing the city are scheduled to testify today against a proposed state law that would allow state Native American tribes, including the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and Houlton Band of Maliseets, to have the same powers as a municipality in areas such as law enforcement and education. L.D. 2221 is scheduled for a hearing before the Legislature’s Judiciary Committee this afternoon in Augusta. City Manager Steven Buck and Timothy Woodcock, a Bangor attorney, will offer testimony opposing the bill that implements the recommendations of the Tribal-State Work Group. The panel, formed in 2006, has been studying differences between the interpretations of the settlement acts of the state’s four federally recognized Indian tribes and has issued its recommendations.

Tribal-State Relations
Written by Bangor Daily News editorial
from Bangor Daily News
March 5, 2008
After years of distrust and sometimes outright hostility, the state’s Indian tribes and state officials have made important progress in improving relations. Many of those gains can be solidified through passage of LD 2221, a bill that codifies the recommendations of the Tribal-State Work Group.

Maine Indian land act revision to receive a public hearing
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
February 26, 2008
The Senate and the House have forwarded a bill to the Judiciary Committee that would change the original Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980.

Maine's proposed amendments fall short of bolstering sovereignty
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
February 18, 2008
The state legislature will consider amendments to the Maine Implementing Act, but the proposals fall short of what tribal leaders hoped for: an affirmation the Wabanaki tribes' inherent sovereignty and immunity, and their rights as federally recognized American Indian tribes.

Bill addresses tribal-state relationship
Written by Edward French
from The Quoddy Tides
February 8, 2008
An 18-member Tribal-State Work Group has recommended eight changes to the Maine Implementing Act, the companion legislation to the 1980 Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act, and the Micmac Settlement Act that have been incorporated into a bill that will be considered during the current session of the legislature. The changes range from having the four Maine tribes not be subject to the state's Freedom of Access laws to requiring mandatory mediation by the Maine Indian Tribal State Commission (MITSC) for any tribal-state disputes.

Tribes, state propose settlement act changes
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
January 12, 2008
Legislative language still has to be drafted and scrutinized, but members of the Tribal-State Work Group were able to reach broad consensus Friday on several potential changes to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980.

Tribes seek changes to law limiting independence
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
December 22, 2007
True sovereignty is the goal of Maine’s American Indian tribes as they work to change state laws they say restrict their ability to self-govern. The Tribal-State Work Group, created in 2006 by Gov. John Baldacci to review the Maine Implementing Act and improve tribal-state relations, was slated to report to the Legislature the first of the year, but needs more time to complete revisions. The Maine Implementing Act was passed to put into action the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980.

Former officials:settlement act intended to protect tribal sovereignty
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
December 10, 2007
The state's former chief negotiator has said that the legislation passed almost three decades ago to govern the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act was meant to recognize tribal authority and sovereignty on Indian lands, not diminish it. John Paterson, the state's former deputy attorney general, told the Tribal-State Work Group Nov. 19 there was no intention on the part of the state's negotiations to limit the Passamaquoddy, Penobscot and Maliseet tribes' authority over internal tribal matters or erode their sovereignty on tribal lands when the Maine Implementing Act was negotiated. The legislation was passed in 1980 to ratify and activate the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act between the state and the three tribes.

Is Maine really 'out of the woods?'
Written by Sun Journal editorial
from Sun Journal
November 22, 2007
One would think if Maine's Indians can fight for this country, we should respect the culture and values of theirs. Though the prejudicial accusations regarding gambling are overblown, subtle acts of defiance - like the squaw issue - do indicate needed understanding and compassion is lacking.

Bangor: Tribes, state to amend acts
Written by Aimee Dolloff
from Bangor Daily News
October 4, 2007
The state’s Wabanaki American Indian tribes remained focused Wednesday on four main issues that they hope to address while studying differences in the interpretation and understanding of the Settlement Acts between the tribes and the state.

Tribal-State Work Group highlights critical issues
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
September 3, 2007
Tribal representatives put three major issues on the table at the first meeting of the Tribal-State Work Group, which is examining possible changes to the legislation governing the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act. Dispute resolution, the tribes' status as ''municipalities'' and tribal sovereignty were highlighted as the main issues in need of attention.

Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission Releases Wabanaki: A New Dawn DVD
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission
April 27, 2007
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) now has available its film video Wabanaki: A New Dawn in DVD format.

Maine tribes hope settlement act revisions will affirm sovereignty
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
April 16, 2007
Wabanaki Leaders are hopeful that the Tribal-State Work Group will lead to meaningful changes to resolve differences in interpretation of the Maine Implementing Act held by the Tribes and the State of Maine

Tribal-state progress
Written by Editorial Bangor Daily News
from Bangor Daily News
April 10, 2007
A group set up to foster discussion of tribal issues has done a lot to improve relations between lawmakers and the state’s Indian tribes. The Tribal-State Working Group should be continued so it can get to difficult issues that have resulted in litigation in the past. Lawmakers should support LD 1263, which will continue the group’s work for another year.

New era in tribal-state relations
Written by John Dieffenbacher-Krall
from Sun Journal
April 1, 2007
Maine's government and Indian tribes are rebuilding a fractured trust

THUMBS UP — Wayne Newell a great pick
Written by Editorial - Monday Meter
from Brunswick Times Record
March 26, 2007
History was made this week when the Maine Senate confirmed Wayne Newell to the University of Maine System board of trustees.

Partnership With Sipayik Criminal Justice Commission
Written by Paul Thibeault
from Wabanaki Legal News Spring 2007 - Vol. 10 issue 2
March 21, 2007
Staff members from the Native American Unit continue to work closely with the Sipayik Criminal Justice Commission (SCJC) on a range of issues concerning the treatment of Native people in the state criminal justice system and correctional facilities. Relationship with the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC): Pine Tree Legal and the Sipayik Criminal Justice Commission have been working closely with MITSC on criminal justice and corrections issues.

PINE TREE LEGAL TEAMS UP WITH MITSC FOR LEGISLATIVE ORIENTATION
Written by Paul Thibeault
from Wabanaki Legal News Spring 2007 - Vol. 10 issue 2
March 21, 2007
On January 25, 2007, Paul Bisulca and John Dieffenbacher-Krall from MITSC and Paul Thibeault from Pine Tree Legal briefed a joint session of the Maine Legislature on the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act, Maine Implementing Act, general Indian Law, and the state of tribal-state relations.

AUGUSTA: Senate OKs appointments to UMS Board of Trustees
Written by
from Portland Press Herald
March 21, 2007
The Maine Senate on Tuesday, March 20, finalized two appointments to the University of Maine System Board of Trustees, including Wayne Newell of Princeton, the first American Indian to serve on the panel.

Wayne A. Newell nominated to serve University of Maine System board of
Written by Judy Harrison
from Bangor Daily News
March 16, 2007
Passamaquoddy Elder Wayne Newell receives unanimous support from the Maine Legislature's Education & Cultural Affairs Committee to serve on the University of Maine System Board of Trustees

Passamaquoddy educator nominated to university board
Written by Gale Courey Toensing
from Indian Country Today
March 16, 2007
Wayne Newell, a Passamaquoddy educator and tribal council member, has been nominated by Maine Gov. John Balducci to the board of trustees for the University of Maine System.

Indian inmates' religious rights supported
Written by Judy Harrison
from Bangor Daily News
March 8, 2007
Wabanaki leaders, the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission, Catholics, Protestants and Muslims endorse LD 507, An Act Recognizing Native American Religion in Maine Prisons and Jails

University trustee nominee is national treasure
Written by Kennebec Journal/Morning Sentinel Editorial
from Kennebec Journal/Morning Sentinel
March 1, 2007
Passamaquoddy Elder Wayne Newell is an outstanding choice for the University of Maine System Board of Trustees

Tribal-state commission fills roster
Written by Jeff Tuttle
from Bangor Daily News
March 29, 2006
Deputy Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Commissioner Paul F. Jacques was unanimoulsy supported by the Maine Legislature's Judiciary Committee for a vacant State appointee seat on the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission.

Panel taps 1st tribal chairman
Written by Jeff Tuttle
from Bangor Daily News
December 21, 2005
The Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission elected Paul Bisulca, a Penobscot Nation member, as its first Tribal chairperson.

Picture from Wabanaki Day
Written by
from
June 3, 2002
Representatives from all four Tribes came to the State House for Wabanaki Day.

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