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MITSC Frequently Asked Questions
About FAQ
Q: Does the MITSC control all fishing in Maine?
A: No. The MITSC has regulatory jurisdiction over MITSC waters defined in 30 MRSA section 6207, subsection 3 (also see the FAQ "What waters are under the jurisdiction of the MITSC?). The Commission adopted fishing rules for the waters under its jurisdiction in 1998.

Q: Who is the Director of the MITSC?
A: John Dieffenbacher-Krall is the Executive Director of the MITSC. Questions about the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission may be posed by calling (207) 817-3799 or emailing mitsced@roadrunner.com.

Q: What does "At Loggerheads" mean?
A: "At Loggerheads" is a term that means engaged in a dispute. It captures the deeply held disagreements between the State of Maine and the Tribes (Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Maliseet, and Micmac) regarding their government-to-government relationship.

Q: I am interested in finding out more about my Indian heritage. Who do I contact?
A: Contact one of the five Tribal governments by going to the Resources section.

Q: What waters are under the jurisdiction of the MITSC?
A: Fishing on open water in Indian Territory As a result of the Maine Indian Claim Settlement Act of 1980, the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission has exclusive jurisdiction over fishing on any pond of greater than 10 acres with 50% or more of shoreline within Indian (Passamaquoddy or Penobscot) territory and any section of a river, brook or stream both sides of which are in Indian territory or one side of which is in Indian territory for a continuous length of 1/2 mile or more. The Commission has adopted rules which affect the following waters within Indian Territory. Waters subject to special provisions are so indicated. Any season, method, bag or size limits not modified in this section fall under General Law provisions. Waters in Passamaquoddy Territory Franklin County Lowelltown Township — Clear, Elaine, Big Indian, Little Indian, Trout, and Twin Island Ponds: Daily bag limit on brook trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 10 inches. Rivers, brooks and streams — General Law Provisions apply Hancock County T3 ND — Lower and Side Pistol Lakes: General Law Provisions apply T4 ND — Kilman Pond: Minimum length limit on brook trout: 10 inches. Middle & Upper Chain Lakes, Middle & Upper Pistol Lakes: General Law Provisions apply. Sections of rivers, brooks and streams in Indian Territory in T3 and T4ND: General Law provisions apply. Penobscot County T5R1 NBPP — Mill Privilege Lake: General Law Provisions apply. Sections of all rivers, brooks and streams in Indian Territory in T5 R1 NBPP, T3R9 NWP, and TAR7 WELS: General law Provisions apply. Somerset County Hammond Township — Section of South Branch Penobscot River in Indian Territory: April 1-August 15: daily bag limit on trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 6 inches (only 1 may exceed 12 inches). From August 16 - September 30: S-6; daily bag limit on trout: 1 fish; minimum length: 6 inches. Holeb Township — (Big) Fish Pond and thoroughfare/tributary upstream to Little Fish Pond and Grassy Pond: S-5; daily bag limit on brook trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 14 inches. (Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife rules prohibit use of motors greater than 10 horsepower). Little Fish & Grassy Ponds: Daily bag limit on brook trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 10 inches. Prentiss Township — Cape Horn Pond: S-5; Daily bag limit on brook trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 10 inches. Mary Petuche Pond, Prentiss TWP. Subject to Tribal regulation and will be posted. Duncan Pond: S-6; Daily bag limit on brook trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 10 inches. Duncan Pond and unnamed inlet stream from Hall Pond will be closed to smelting in 2002 and every even year thereafter. The daily bag limit on smelts is 1 quart. Hall Pond: S-5; Daily bag limit on brook trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 10 inches. Lower Welman Pond: S-6; daily bag limit on brook trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 10 inches. South Branch, Penobscot River: April 1- August 15: daily bag limit on trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 6 inches (only 1 may exceed 12 inches). From August 16 – September 30: S-6; daily bag limit on trout: 1 fish; minimum length: 6 inches. Sections of all other rivers, brooks and streams in Indian Territory in the above Somerset County Townships, as well as in Alder Brook, Pittson Academy, Soldiertown, and Hammond Townships: General Law provisions apply. Washington County T5 NDBPP — Lower Chain & Sysladobsis (Lower) Lakes: General Law Provisions apply. T19 MDBPP — Grassy Pond: General Law Provisions apply (pages 4 – 6). Sections of brooks and streams in Indian Territory in T5 NDBPP and T19 MDBPP: General Law Provisions apply. Waters in Penobscot Territory Franklin County Alder Stream Township — Round Mountain Pond: Opens May 1. S-5; Daily bag limit on trout: 2 fish; minimum length limit: 10 inches. Alder Stream: From confluence of Alder & Little Alder Streams downstream to Penobscot Territory boundary lines: April 1 – August 15: Anglers age 15 and under may use single-pointed artificial lures; S-5 for anglers age 16 and older. August 16 – September 30: S-5. Rest of Alder & Little Alder Streams & tributaries in Indian Territory: S-5. North Branch Dead River: S-5. Penobscot County Argyle Township — Sections of Birch, East Branch Birch, and Hemlock Streams in Indian Territory: General Law Provisions apply. T3R1 NBPP — Section of East Branch Passadumkeag River in Indian Territory: General Law Provisions apply. T2 and T3R9 NWP — East Branch Lake: April 1– June 20: closed to the taking of bass. June 21- September 30: daily bag limit on bass: 1 fish, minimum length limit: 12 inches except that all bass between 16 – 20 inches must be immediately released alive. Mattamiscontis & Little Mattamiscontis Lakes: General Law Provisions apply. Sections of East Branch Seboeis, Mattamiscontis, and Sam Ayers Streams and Johnny Ayers, Mountain and Squirrel Brooks in Indian Territory: General Law Provisions apply. T6R8 WELS — First Lake Matagamon & Mountain Catcher Pond: Daily bag limit on trout: 2 fish: minimum length limit on brook trout: 10 inches. Section of Mountain Catcher Stream in Indian Territory: General Law Provisions apply. Piscataquis County Williamsburg Township — Sections of Merrill, Roaring, Stinking, and Whetstone Brooks and West Branch Pleasant River in Indian Territory: General Law Provisions apply. Waters regulated by tribes Any pond of 10 acres or less is regulated by the Tribe in whose territory the pond is located. Contact appropriate Tribal Headquarters for further regulations on such waters. The Tribes also regulate sustenance fishing by tribal members on inland waters within their reservations. The following regulations apply to waters regulated by the Penobscot Nation in Alder Stream Township in Franklin County — Blanchard and Snow Mountain Ponds: S-5; no motors allowed. The Passamaquoddy Tribe may require a permit for access to its waters within its reservation at Indian Township in Washington County including Big Lake, Grand Falls Flowage, Lewy Lake, Long Lake, Georgie Brook, Berry Brook and Tomah Stream.

Q: Who is the chairperson of the MITSC?
A: Ms. Jamie Bissonette Lewey was elected chairperson of the MITSC on July 1, 2010. She was elected to a four-year term.

Q: How was the MITSC created?
A: The MITSC is a creation of the Maine Implementing Act (30 MRSA §6101 - §6214), the State of Maine’s codification of the Maine Indian Claims Settlement agreement reached between the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, Passamaquoddy Tribe, Penobscot Nation, State of Maine, and US.

Q: What is the MITSC?
A: MITSC is the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission.

Q: What are the MITSC’s responsibilities?
A: The MITSC’s principal responsibility is to “continually review the effectiveness of this Act (Maine Implementing Act) and the social, economic and legal relationship between the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, Passamaquoddy Tribe, Penobscot Nation and the State.” The MITSC is also responsible for making recommendations about the acquisition of certain lands to be included in Indian Territory, promulgating fishing rules for certain ponds, rivers, and streams adjacent to or within Indian Territory, making recommendations about fish and wildlife management policies on non-Indian lands to protect fish and wildlife stocks on lands and waters subject to regulation by the Passamaquoddy Tribe, the Penobscot Indian Nation, or MITSC, and reviewing petitions by the Tribes for designation as an “extended reservation.”

Q: Who are the MITSC Commissioners?
A: Two Commissioner seats are reserved for the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, two seats exist for the Passamaquoddy Tribe (one for the Tribal Government at Motahkmikuk and one for the Tribal Government at Sipayik), two Commissioner seats belong to the Penobscot Nation, and six seats are designated to State appointees nominated by the Governor of the State of Maine and subject to legislative confirmation. The twelve Commissioners elect a thirteenth member to serve as the Chair. All Commissioners serve three-year terms except for the Chair who serves a four-year term. Currently, Matthew Dana II, Public Safety Coordinator, represents the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Motahkmikuk, and Vera Francis, a Tribal Planner, represents the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Sipayik. Linda Raymond, Maliseet Tribal Council member, and Brian Reynolds, Tribal Administrator, represent the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians. John Banks, the Penobscot Nation’s Natural Resources Director, and Robert Polchies, a singer, drummer, and songwriter, represent the Penobscot Nation. Harold Clossey, President & CEO, Maine Development Foundation, Gail Dana-Sacco, Assistant Research Professor at the U. of Maine, Richard Gould, former State Legislator and teacher, Joan Nass, former State Legislator and teacher, and H. Roy Partridge, Special Assistant to the President for Multicultural Affairs at Bowdoin College, represent the State of Maine. One State Commissioner seat is vacant. Ms. Jamie Bissonette Lewey serves as the MITSC Chair. She coordinates the Healing Justice Program for the American Friends Service Committee in New England.

Q: What does the term Wabanaki mean?
A: Wabanaki is an umbrella term for the four federally recognized Indian Tribes located in Maine, the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe, and Penobscot Indian Nation.

Q: How can I contact Wabanaki Tribal Governments?
A: Website links for all five Wabanaki Tribal Governments are available under the Resources section of this website. The Aroostook Band of Micmacs main administrative office is located at 7 Northern Road, Presque Isle, Maine 04769. The phone number is 764-1972. The Houlton Band of Maliseets administrative office is located at 88 Bell Road, Littleton, Maine 04730. The phone number is 532-4273. The Passamaquoddy Tribe consists of two reservations with separate Tribal Governments. The Motahkmikuk (Indian Township) Tribal Government can be contacted at PO Box 301, Princeton, Maine 04668. The phone number is 796-2301. The Sipayik (Pleasant Point) Tribal Government mailing address is 9 Sakom Road, Perry, ME 04667. The phone number is 853-2600. The Penobscot Nation Community Building is located at 12 Wabanaki Way, Indian Island, ME 04468. The phone number is 827-7776.

Q: Who are the Wabanaki Tribal Representatives to the Maine Legislature?
A: Madonna Soctomah is the Passamaquoddy Tribal Representative to the Maine Legislature. Wayne Mitchell is the Penobscot Tribal Representative to the Maine Legislature. Henry John Bear is the Maliseet Tribal Representative to the Maine Legislature. Contact information for them can be found at the State of Maine website, www.maine.gov. Select the website category Legislature, then House of Representatives, and then click on members.

Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC)
P.O. Box 241
Stillwater, Maine 04489
(207) 817-3799
Email: mitsced@roadrunner.com
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